danwinckler.com/video


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On March 10th I did live video projections for the final rounds of the Laptop Battle at the AMODA Digital Showcase at South by Southwest 2012. Many talented musicians and visualists performed and showed their work — check them out.

Music: “plexiglass afternoon” by DXM (who was one of the eight contestants and came in second!)
Video documentation: Emily Kornblut

Thanks to Chris Jordan and Anton Marini for loaning me their gear! Chris has built a number of multi-mirror reflectors (that you can see briefly at 01:05 in the video) that split the projection beam up into a rotating spray of smaller images. The result is gorgeous and I am very thankful I have such generous friends who’ll share the gear and expertise with me.

Shot on a Panasonic GH2 with hacked firmware and a Canon FD 50mm f/1.4, no color correction. The trains are an annual holiday display at the Roberson Museum in Binghamton, NY. Music graciously provided by the wonderful band The Octopus Project.

Watch on Vimeo or download from the Internet Archive.

Hi folks. The weekend before last I shot some pretty footage in my office and turned it into a music video. It’s set to a beautiful, minimal/ambient track by John Chantler and you can watch it below. Once you’re done watching it, scroll down to read an explanation of what the footage is of.

Kalorama by Dan Winckler on Vimeo.

I shot and edited this video as exercise. I was spurred to do it, to do it expeditiously, and to finish it when someone tweeted about the Cult of Done Manifesto, which I hadn’t read in a while. All in all, it was very satisfying and I hope people like it.

Mysteries revealed

The two first guesses about the nature of the footage that I received (from Benton-C Bainbridge and Chris Jordan) were pretty much dead-on. It’s sunlight reflecting off a plastic (mylar?) book cover, which I crinkled and tugged at slightly while recording. Benton guessed it right first so he gets the cookies. If I’m getting my optics right, these kinds of reflections are known as caustics, and I have always found them very, very beautiful. All of the effects were done in post and I tried to keep them subtle. I’m pleased that I succeeded to some measure since CJ guessed that the chromatic aberrations were done with a polarizer.

Roger Ho has a great eye. He also has really impressive focus-pulling ability. Check out this video he shot of The Octopus Project playing in Dallas on Thursday night.

Also, Roger Ho is an enigma. What’s your story, Roger? Drop me a line.

Sketch time. Less keyboard, more hands.